Waterwatch

SOMETHING IN THE WATER

Having a river in your backyard is a lovely idea, not always so pleasant in reality, as fences and dead animals go swirling past in a flood, or when you find out that a city upstream is putting something in the water that shouldn’t be there.

Waterwatch has been a great way to find out what actually is swimming or floating under the river’s surface.   Previously we could only guess, but now I know the phosphate, nitrate and dissolved oxygen levels, turbidity, electrical conductivity and ph.Murrumbidgee view from AdnamiraDuring the first year I was collecting data it rained a lot, the river levels were high and the readings were very clean.  Since last year however, the river has been mostly low, and the nitrate levels are generally off the charts high. Continue reading

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LIZARD CROSSING

It’s the time of year to see reptiles out and about on the roads again. bearded-dragon-on-road Bearded dragons (pogona barbata) do threatening push-ups as they try to frighten off approaching cars.  Or they lie as flat as possible like this one is doing, before scuttling quickly away.

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WATERWATCHING

I now have a wonderful kit that will tell me what’s in the water that flows past our house.Measuring phosphates using colour disc 3

Finally, we have some way to tell what’s going on underwater, other than just admiring clear water rippling over rocks.   Or staring at turbid brown floodwater, with the occasional tree or wombat carcass floating by, while hoping that we’ll soon be able to get across.

flood at junction of Mullion Creek and Murrumbidgee bridge underwater

Andrew Leonard displaying a 2010 flood (no carcases)

Upper Murrumbidgee Waterwatch came to my assistance, specifically Woo O’Reilly and Damon Cusack who  introduced me to the world of water testing, water bug assessing and riparian condition reporting. Continue reading