PIXIE DUST, KITES AND PINK HATS

There's nothing better than a beautiful day out on the hillside, unless it's a beautiful day out with lots of lovely people planting trees. This year we had the wonderful team from Justin Borevitz's lab at ANU, along with another hundred yellow box  (eucalyptus melliodora) that they raised from seed, genotyped and either pampered or subjected... Continue Reading →

GOING TINY – WITH TREES

I've started adding some tiny triangles to my collection of revegetation plots over our hills. My plans for tree-planting have been evolving over the past four years since we moved back to live at the family farm.  I started knowing we needed to do something substantial, because the small amounts of revegetation we'd been doing... Continue Reading →

OUT STANDING IN A FIELD

A few old trees make all the difference when you're doing a bird survey.  The bare, newly planted paddocks on Carkella and Adnamira were limited to a few species, mainly parrots (galahs,red-rumps, rosellas) and a small family of magpies. On a grey morning in April three ornithologists from Canberra Ornithologists Group (Sue Lashko, Chris Davey... Continue Reading →

THANK YOU FOR THE WATER…

Brazil's coastal rainforest could hardly be more distant from a sheep farm in New South Wales.  Yet I found visiting it both inspirational and helpful for my own plans. The rainforest plant life is nothing like our dry eucalypts and grasses.  While there are a few ancient relatives of Australian plants, most of the vegetation looks as... Continue Reading →

RIPPING INTO OUR PROBLEM PADDOCK

Tree planting doesn't always go as planned. In 2011, before we actually moved back to Australia, I spoke to Graham Fifield at Greening Australia about being part of their WOPR (Whole Paddock Rehabilitation) program.  That program is designed to revegetate an area of 10 hectares or more, using bands of trees and shrubs directly seeded on the contours.... Continue Reading →

A BIG DAY OUT FOR SMALL BIRDS

This year the grand finale of our tree linkage project was not even on our own land.  To complete the 3.9 kilometres (2.4 miles) of small plots that will allow birds like diamond firetails (stagonopleura guttata) and speckled warblers (chthonicola sagittata) to move around the landscape, we planted a larger area at the edge of... Continue Reading →

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